TV Review: Confess

As a huge fan of Colleen Hoover’s work, I was excited to see the TV adaptation of her ninth novel, Confess.

For a refresh, and for those who haven’t read the book, here’s the summary:

Auburn Reed is determined to rebuild her shattered life and she has no room for mistakes. But when she walks into a Dallas art studio in search of a job, she doesn’t expect to become deeply attracted to the studio’s enigmatic artist, Owen Gentry.

For once, Auburn takes a chance and puts her heart in control, only to discover that Owen is hiding a huge secret. The magnitude of his past threatens to destroy everything Auburn loves most, and the only way to get her life back on track is to cut Owen out of it—but can she do it? [Goodreads]

I tend to tread lightly into adaptations of books, mostly because they are a disappointment. Confess wasn’t my favourite Hoover novel, so I was less worried about them ‘ruining’ the book and more excited to see how it’s adapted.

The series is made up of seven episodes, each lasting 20 minutes. I am super impressed that Elissa Down, the writer and director, managed to jam the major events in the book into the series. So of course, that’s great and the story arc remains very much the same. The actors also did a fabulous job with the script.

I really didn’t like the book version of Auburn. She was a bit flat and nothing made her stick. What Katie Leclerc, who plays Auburn Reed in the show, brought forward was better than in the book. She’s awkward and unsure about herself, especially when it comes to Owen. She is also always with food, which I love more than I should but awkarward+food is also me. Auburn’s always being told what she needs to do and you can really feel how alone she is  because of this. She’s got the pressure of everyone around her but seeking the company of Owen Gentry is her first personal choice.

But of course, this creates conflict in what she’s really moved for and her internal battle is shown through unsent text messages. This was a very awkward, especially when it came to the end of the first episode when AJ is introduced. It made the end of that episode anticlimactic and wasn’t as a big moment as I would have liked.

It was still very true to the book in the case of Trey and Linda. Once a villain, always a villain. I don’t think there is anything that could make me feel anything but hate for the duo. Rock Myers plays the bastard cop, Trey, pretending he’s doing Auburn favours when he’s disturbingly creepy and greedy with his social power as a police officer. Linda (Sherilynn Fenn), acts coolly as she brushes Auburn off several times, refusing to let her see AJ, and scorning Auburn throughout. I do feel like Auburn should have been a bit more sassier with Linda, just because I found many of Auburn’s reactions to Linda annoying and like a child. Though maybe this was to show her helplessness with their relationship.

Ryan Cooper, or as I like to call him ‘fifty shades look alike guy’, also exceeded my expectations. The whole looks thing bugs me, although I’ve read many trailer comments and no one else seems to have a problem with the similarity. I honestly just don’t want people to buy into the TV series as another Fifty Shades! Owen is one of the more complex main characters in the book and although there were touches of his relationship with his father (played by Kyle Secor,), I wish there was more, especially when it comes to his gallery. Secor was a brilliant as Callahan Gentry, calm collected in the presence of other people and nothing like a father when with Owen alone. Even though Callahan pulls through at the end, it isn’t enough to redeem himself from being a shitty father.

I would have liked to seen and hear about Owen’s past relationships. In the book, Owen has always had relationship problems because he’s so focused on his work. But his art doesn’t seem to be too time consuming… we hardly see him do any work!

Inevitably, due to the short series, there are some things that had to be compromised. The most disjointing thing about the series was the time frame that it was given.  It goes from Auburn and Owen meeting to three months later.

Auburn and Owen’s romance becomes an insta-love story instead of the slow build in the book. It was definitely up several notches, including too many ‘steamy’ scenes that just felt like a bit too much. The bar scene after the gallery show was cut. I loved that scene because it was the part of the book where we first read about Owen trying to impress Auburn, as she tries to keep him at arms length. Compromising, they did however they include the ten seconds of dancing, which I did appreciate and found super cute.

Sadly, no shell soaps but they have a variation of the blue tent.

They also seemed to have a really odd backing music throughout many of the scenes and music transitions that were noticeably awkward. Sometimes I felt like the scenes could have done with no music in the background as it took away the moments that were happening on screen.

Overall, I really enjoyed it – I think the first episode is my favourite!

My rating
I really liked it

4 cup

 

There’s a bunch of things that I’ve definitely left out so I’d love to hear what everyone else’s thoughts are about the series!

Even more interesting, I’d love to hear anyone’s thoughts about it if you haven’t read the book.

Comment below and leave your thoughts about the series! Let’s discuss!

Watch the Confess trailer below!

All seven episodes are streamable on Go90. They are also slowly releasing the series on YouTube for those who can’t watch it on Go90!

Read my review of the novel Confess here.

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